Make a Copper Triangle Mobile

Are triangles still cool? I hope so, because I’m not over them. When I came across a copper triangle mobile the other day, I knew I had to make my own. But I was surprised by just how much I like it. It’s pretty mesmerizing to watch it make new shapes as it spins around–now I know why people use them to hypnotize their babies to sleep! I put a little video of it spinning on Instagram here, if you want to see it.

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.

You can hang this either indoors or out, and since I left mine unsealed and plan to keep it outside, I’m looking forward to seeing how the patina on it develops over time.

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.

Even if you only have yourself to hypnotize, this is a quick, easy project with a fun outcome!

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.

DIY Copper Triangle Mobile

Materials

1/8″ copper tubing, 72″ total
Florists wire
Clear fishing line or microfilament
Clear spray sealer (optional)

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.

Tools

Tubing cutter
Ruler
Scissors
Marker
Wirecutters (optional, some florists wire includes a cutter)
Needlenose pliers (optional)

Steps

1. Measure and cut 3 pieces of 8″ tube, and 3 pieces of 4″ tube. If you’re using the same 12″ pieces I used, you’ll only need to make one cut per tube to have the lengths you need (only three cuts total). If you’re using tubing that came in a different length, also cut 3 12″ tubes, otherwise you can just use three of the tubes in the 12″ lengths they came in. When you’re done, you’ll have the following pieces:

(3) 12″
(3) 8″
(3) 4″

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.

If you prefer metric measurements, your tubes should be 30 cm, 20 cm, and 10 cm.

2. Cut a piece of wire an inch or two longer than all three of the sides of the triangle you’re trying to make. So at least 37″ for the biggest triangle, 25″ for the middle one, and 13″ for the smallest one. Slide the wire through all three pieces of the triangle tubing.

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.
3. Pull the wire as taut as possible, and form the triangle. Wind the wire together at the end.

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.
4. Trim the pieces of wire so that less than half an inch is left at each end, and tuck those ends into the tubing to hide them. Pliers are helpful for this step, but not required.

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.
5. Once you’ve made all three triangles, line them up inside one another. Cut a piece of clear filament at least a couple of feet long, and tie it in a square knot at one point of the smallest triangle. Tuck the ends inside the tubing. Then tie knots at points on the two larger triangles. Don’t pull them tight until you’ve adjusted the triangle distances from one another.

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.
6. If you want your copper to remain bright and shiny, you’ll need to seal it with a couple of coats of a clear spray sealer. If you choose not to, the copper will patina over time, especially outdoors.

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.

Make a copper triangle mobile, then hang it either indoors or outside.

7 thoughts on “Make a Copper Triangle Mobile

  1. Rosie Walsh says:

    Rachel, can you give a good source for the copper tubing? I’ve seen the copper used for refrigerant lines but it is coiled. Love the look. This would make a great gift.

      • Rosie Walsh says:

        Thanks. So much easier than walking the aisles at a big box store.

        Also, thank you for adding the metric measurements. Wish everyone would do the conversions for us. I just can’t remember the formulas.

        • Rosie, you’re welcome! I’ll keep the metric measurements in mind for future projects. Metric is so much easier–I wish the US would switch! I’d happily do everything in metric only.

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